solar panel project a win-win, waterloo region official sayssolar panel project a win-win, waterloo region official sayssolar panel project a win-win, waterloo region official says

by:Tunto     2020-03-23
KITCHENER —
They recline on the roof of Waterloo\'s water treatment plant in Manheim, leaning south.
Rows of solar panels don\'t seem to do anything at all, but even on cloudy days, they are quietly absorbing the sun, putting that energy into the provincial grid and making money for the region.
The 16 solar systems in the region are very different: from 22-panel, 6-
Kilowatts are installed at the top of the Cambridge daycare center, with more than 1,000 panels generating 287 KW on the roof of the bus facility at the great river transport company Chandler Avenue, from the public housing project to the new police station building at Waterloo.
Ted Pedlar, project partner
The coordinator checks the group\'s live data on his smartphone.
\"They are extracting 27 cents that they can produce,\" he noted \".
\"Cloudy though.
\"Later, he checked again and got a reading of 55 cents.
\"The sun must have come out,\" he said with a smile.
The solar project is a win-win project.
Brian Bechtel said he is in charge of the Energy Conservation Office in the region.
Panels generate clean energy.
Unlike the electricity generated by gasor coal-
Solar power plants do not produce greenhouse gases.
It also does not produce any harmful nuclear waste, which is a by-product of nuclear energy.
\"This shows good environmental management in the area,\" said Bechtel . \".
It does not have a net cost for taxpayers in the region.
These panels actually inject about $150,000 a year into regional coffers over the next 20 years.
After all the fees, this is the net dollar.
Installation, operation cost, principal and interest payment, maintenance-
Considered.
Five years ago, when the region began ambitious solar projects, it made a leap of some kind of faith.
It cost $8.
4 million install 16 items.
In the next month or so, the last two projects will start working.
In order to increase the demand for solar energy, the Ontario government has provided generous rewards in its feed --
In the tariff plan
The region signed 20-
The annual contract sold the electricity generated by its solar project to the Ontario power grid at a much higher price than the market price.
The contractual guarantee paid in the area is between 71. 3 cents and 80.
According to the size of the project, produce 2 cents per kilowatt hour.
In contrast, the price of electricity purchased in the region is about 11 cents.
All in all, the system produces 1.
At 0. 245 billion kilowatt hours per year, it is equivalent to about 130 typical households using electricity each year.
The solar project will generate $2, according to regional officials.
Net income was 98 million per cent of the 20-year contract.
Last year, after the free government scaled back its green energy program and limited the number of profitable FIT contract systems it approved, the project encountered obstacles.
The area has been awarded contracts for 14 systems, but the last two have not been contracted.
The energy they generate is only used by the building itself, replacing conventional electricity with cleaner but more costly energy.
Federal funding for environmental projects ensures a break-even for both projects, although they do not create additional cash for the region.
Applying for a FIT contract is a tedious and arduous process, Bechtel said, and district officials quickly realized that solar energy is not a solution that can be applied to buildings in each region.
\"You have to make sure the building is able to handle the extra load, analyze the direction to make sure it has enough sunlight and make sure there are no large office buildings or big trees,\" bechtel said: \"Because they can severely limit the number of panels exposed to sunlight.
These projects will be paid in about 10 years.
Even after the FIT contract expires, panels with a life of 30 years or more can continue to power the building where they are located.
\"The ultimate goal is for taxpayers to have no cost,\" said Bechtel . \".
Cthoots @ therecord
Com, Weibo: @ thompsonrecord Kitchener-
They recline on the roof of Waterloo\'s water treatment plant in Manheim, leaning south.
Rows of solar panels don\'t seem to do anything at all, but even on cloudy days, they are quietly absorbing the sun, putting that energy into the provincial grid and making money for the region.
The 16 solar systems in the region are very different: from 22-panel, 6-
Kilowatts are installed at the top of the Cambridge daycare center, with more than 1,000 panels generating 287 KW on the roof of the bus facility at the great river transport company Chandler Avenue, from the public housing project to the new police station building at Waterloo.
Ted Pedlar, project partner
The coordinator checks the group\'s live data on his smartphone.
\"They are extracting 27 cents that they can produce,\" he noted \".
\"Cloudy though.
\"Later, he checked again and got a reading of 55 cents.
\"The sun must have come out,\" he said with a smile.
The solar project is a win-win project.
Brian Bechtel said he is in charge of the Energy Conservation Office in the region.
Panels generate clean energy.
Unlike the electricity generated by gasor coal-
Solar power plants do not produce greenhouse gases.
It also does not produce any harmful nuclear waste, which is a by-product of nuclear energy.
\"This shows good environmental management in the area,\" said Bechtel . \".
It does not have a net cost for taxpayers in the region.
These panels actually inject about $150,000 a year into regional coffers over the next 20 years.
After all the fees, this is the net dollar.
Installation, operation cost, principal and interest payment, maintenance-
Considered.
Five years ago, when the region began ambitious solar projects, it made a leap of some kind of faith.
It cost $8.
4 million install 16 items.
In the next month or so, the last two projects will start working.
In order to increase the demand for solar energy, the Ontario government has provided generous rewards in its feed --
In the tariff plan
The region signed 20-
The annual contract sold the electricity generated by its solar project to the Ontario power grid at a much higher price than the market price.
The contractual guarantee paid in the area is between 71. 3 cents and 80.
According to the size of the project, produce 2 cents per kilowatt hour.
In contrast, the price of electricity purchased in the region is about 11 cents.
All in all, the system produces 1.
At 0. 245 billion kilowatt hours per year, it is equivalent to about 130 typical households using electricity each year.
The solar project will generate $2, according to regional officials.
Net income was 98 million per cent of the 20-year contract.
Last year, after the free government scaled back its green energy program and limited the number of profitable FIT contract systems it approved, the project encountered obstacles.
The area has been awarded contracts for 14 systems, but the last two have not been contracted.
The energy they generate is only used by the building itself, replacing conventional electricity with cleaner but more costly energy.
Federal funding for environmental projects ensures a break-even for both projects, although they do not create additional cash for the region.
Applying for a FIT contract is a tedious and arduous process, Bechtel said, and district officials quickly realized that solar energy is not a solution that can be applied to buildings in each region.
\"You have to make sure the building is able to handle the extra load, analyze the direction to make sure it has enough sunlight and make sure there are no large office buildings or big trees,\" bechtel said: \"Because they can severely limit the number of panels exposed to sunlight.
These projects will be paid in about 10 years.
Even after the FIT contract expires, panels with a life of 30 years or more can continue to power the building where they are located.
\"The ultimate goal is for taxpayers to have no cost,\" said Bechtel . \".
Cthoots @ therecord
Com, Weibo: @ thompsonrecord Kitchener-
They recline on the roof of Waterloo\'s water treatment plant in Manheim, leaning south.
Rows of solar panels don\'t seem to do anything at all, but even on cloudy days, they are quietly absorbing the sun, putting that energy into the provincial grid and making money for the region.
The 16 solar systems in the region are very different: from 22-panel, 6-
Kilowatts are installed at the top of the Cambridge daycare center, with more than 1,000 panels generating 287 KW on the roof of the bus facility at the great river transport company Chandler Avenue, from the public housing project to the new police station building at Waterloo.
Ted Pedlar, project partner
The coordinator checks the group\'s live data on his smartphone.
\"They are extracting 27 cents that they can produce,\" he noted \".
\"Cloudy though.
\"Later, he checked again and got a reading of 55 cents.
\"The sun must have come out,\" he said with a smile.
The solar project is a win-win project.
Brian Bechtel said he is in charge of the Energy Conservation Office in the region.
Panels generate clean energy.
Unlike the electricity generated by gasor coal-
Solar power plants do not produce greenhouse gases.
It also does not produce any harmful nuclear waste, which is a by-product of nuclear energy.
\"This shows good environmental management in the area,\" said Bechtel . \".
It does not have a net cost for taxpayers in the region.
These panels actually inject about $150,000 a year into regional coffers over the next 20 years.
After all the fees, this is the net dollar.
Installation, operation cost, principal and interest payment, maintenance-
Considered.
Five years ago, when the region began ambitious solar projects, it made a leap of some kind of faith.
It cost $8.
4 million install 16 items.
In the next month or so, the last two projects will start working.
In order to increase the demand for solar energy, the Ontario government has provided generous rewards in its feed --
In the tariff plan
The region signed 20-
The annual contract sold the electricity generated by its solar project to the Ontario power grid at a much higher price than the market price.
The contractual guarantee paid in the area is between 71. 3 cents and 80.
According to the size of the project, produce 2 cents per kilowatt hour.
In contrast, the price of electricity purchased in the region is about 11 cents.
All in all, the system produces 1.
At 0. 245 billion kilowatt hours per year, it is equivalent to about 130 typical households using electricity each year.
The solar project will generate $2, according to regional officials.
Net income was 98 million per cent of the 20-year contract.
Last year, after the free government scaled back its green energy program and limited the number of profitable FIT contract systems it approved, the project encountered obstacles.
The area has been awarded contracts for 14 systems, but the last two have not been contracted.
The energy they generate is only used by the building itself, replacing conventional electricity with cleaner but more costly energy.
Federal funding for environmental projects ensures a break-even for both projects, although they do not create additional cash for the region.
Applying for a FIT contract is a tedious and arduous process, Bechtel said, and district officials quickly realized that solar energy is not a solution that can be applied to buildings in each region.
\"You have to make sure the building is able to handle the extra load, analyze the direction to make sure it has enough sunlight and make sure there are no large office buildings or big trees,\" bechtel said: \"Because they can severely limit the number of panels exposed to sunlight.
These projects will be paid in about 10 years.
Even after the FIT contract expires, panels with a life of 30 years or more can continue to power the building where they are located.
\"The ultimate goal is for taxpayers to have no cost,\" said Bechtel . \".
Cthoots @ therecord
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